Dublin nursing homes operator tees up bid to buy Smurfit’s K Club golf resort

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – A couple who operated an animal rescue face multiple charges after authorities found about 150 dead dogs on property in Missouri and Texas and rescued hundreds more animals that were packed into cages and living in “unimaginable” conditions, law enforcement said.

Tiffany and Steven Woodington operated All Accounted For, which brought animals from Texas to Missouri, the Benton County, Missouri, Sheriff’s Office said in a Facebook post Monday. Authorities said they found nearly 300 animals living at the operations in Texas and Missouri, but that many of the animals had to be euthanized because of poor health.

Tiffany Woodington, 49, is charged in Missouri with 10 counts of felony animal abuse and two misdemeanor counts of animal abuse. Her husband, Steven Woodington, 55, is charged in Texas with 19 counts of animal cruelty. A second man described as the caretaker also was charged in Texas with animal cruelty.

All three are free on bond.

Cameron County, Texas, Sheriff Omar Lucio said Tuesday that authorities discovered about 270 animals – about two dozen of them dead – on property in the small community of Los Fresnos, which is north of Brownsville in the far southern part of the state. They were found Sept. 9 after authorities received complaints from neighbors about barking dogs, according to Lucio and Cameron County prosecutor Edward Sandoval. Deputies found many of the dogs covered in feces and urine, with two or three of them packed together in each cage. Authorities estimated that more than half of the Texas dogs wouldn’t survive or would have to be euthanized.

Paul Fourt Jr., the attorney for Steven Woodington, said his client intends to plead not guilty to the charges.

“He was at all times trying to rescue and save those animals,” Fourt said, explaining that Woodington intended to also send the dogs to shelters in Kansas and Oklahoma so that they could ultimately be adopted. Fourt indicated that others were responsible for their mistreatment.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – A couple who operated an animal rescue face multiple charges after authorities found about 150 dead dogs on property in Missouri and Texas and rescued hundreds more animals that were packed into cages and living in “unimaginable” conditions, law enforcement said.

Tiffany Woodington, 49, is charged in Missouri with 10 counts of felony animal abuse and two misdemeanor counts of animal abuse. Her husband, Steven Woodington, 55, is charged in Texas with 19 counts of animal cruelty. A second man described as the caretaker also was charged in Texas with animal cruelty.

Tiffany and Steven Woodington operated All Accounted For, which brought animals from Texas to Missouri, the Benton County, Missouri, Sheriff’s Office said in a Facebook post Monday. Authorities said they found nearly 300 animals living at the operations in Texas and Missouri, but that many of the animals had to be euthanized because of poor health.

All three are free on bond.

Cameron County, Texas, Sheriff Omar Lucio said Tuesday that authorities discovered about 270 animals – about two dozen of them dead – on property in the small community of Los Fresnos, which is north of Brownsville in the far southern part of the state. They were found Sept. 9 after authorities received complaints from neighbors about barking dogs, according to Lucio and Cameron County prosecutor Edward Sandoval. Deputies found many of the dogs covered in feces and urine, with two or three of them packed together in each cage. Authorities estimated that more than half of the Texas dogs wouldn’t survive or would have to be euthanized.

“This is the worst case of animal abuse I’ve ever seen,” said Lucio, who’s been in law enforcement for more than 50 years. “The multitude? It’s staggering, it’s staggering to the imagination.”

Paul Fourt Jr., the attorney for Steven Woodington, said his client intends to plead not guilty to the charges.

“It is going to take a long time to rehabilitate these animals,” she said, adding that one dog and one cat found in Missouri had to be euthanized for medical reasons.

Benton County Sheriff Eric Knox said he had heard “not a word” about problems before the dead animals were found, even though the nearest neighbor lived about 500 feet away.

“It really surprises me that no one in the community said, ‘You better check that lady out.’ And the smell, as soon as I drove up, I could smell it,” he said. “I am a dog lover, and I struggle with it.”

One of the leaders of Extinction Rebellion has been arrested, after he tried to fly a drone near Heathrow

One of the leaders of Extinction Rebellion has been arrested, after he tried to fly a drone near Heathrow .

Roger Hallam was detained on Saturday while attempting to disrupt flights at Britain’s busiest airport with the device.

It is the second time in three days the co-founder of the environmental protest group has been arrested.

On Thursday he was stopped during a pre-emptive wave of arrests ahead of the climate change action and was bailed with conditions not to be within five miles of any airport or possess drone equipment, Extinction Rebellion (XR) said.

Footage appears to show him being dragged into a van by several police officers.

 

 

All were detained on suspicion of conspiring to commit a public nuisance or attempting to commit a public nuisance, with 16 people since released on police bail.

A 53-year-old man arrested on Thursday was arrested again on Saturday and taken into police custody, the force added.

A dispersal order around the airport will remain in place until 4.30am on Sunday “to prevent criminal activity which poses a significant safety and security risk to the airport”, the force said.

 

Heathrow and police refused to comment on specific measures they may have taken to stop the protesters’ drones from working, but one expert said existing technology can jam signals between operators and drones.

Richard Gill, chief executive of Drone Defence, told the PA news agency: “That technology is definitely available and can do exactly that.

“When a drone is operated remotely it relies on a radio connection between the drone and the pilot.

Heathrow Pause claimed one activist was “meditating in a garden when he was bitten on both legs by a police dog” on Thursday.

But the Metropolitan Police said while they attempted to arrest a man in Hornsey, north London, “he made off from them on foot”.

A spokeswoman added: “He was pursued by officers and a police dog, which bit the man on the leg as he was subsequently detained.

“The man received minor injuries to his leg but declined to be taken to hospital.

“He was arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to commit public nuisance and taken to a police station, where he currently remains in police custody.”

“Interference can cut that connection between the operator and the drone.”

Former Paralympian James Brown was arrested at terminal two on Friday after he took part in the protest, and he told PA that there were up to 35 people willing to fly the devices in an attempt to cause disruption.

 

“That conversation is now happening. It is incumbent on all of us to keep it going.”

Heathrow Airport confirmed its runways were open and said they were committed to addressing climate change.

It said in a statement on Friday: “We will continue to work with the authorities to carry out dynamic risk assessment programmes and keep our passengers flying safely on their journeys today.

“We agree with the need for climate change action but illegal protest activity, designed with the intention of disrupting thousands of people, is not the answer.

“The answer to climate change is in constructive engagement and working together to address the issue, something that Heathrow remains strongly committed to do.”

Earlier this week, Deputy Assistant Met Commissioner Laurence Taylor advised Heathrow passengers to travel as normal and said they were “confident” disruption would be kept to a minimum.

This action is the latest in a string of climate change protests this year, including the widespread action in London in April, which saw Extinction Rebellion bring sites including Oxford Circus and Waterloo Bridge to a standstill.

Eight babies were killed when a fire ripped through the maternity unit at a hospital in eastern Algeria

Eleven babies, 107 women and 28 staff were rescued in the blaze that killed the eight newborns in the maternity wing of a hospital in the city of Oued Souf.

Eight babies were killed when a fire ripped through the maternity unit at a hospital in eastern Algeria before dawn on Tuesday, emergency services said.

The cause of the fire was not immediately clear, Bernaoui said.

Prime Minister Noureddine Bedoui ordered an enquiry and sent Health Minister Mohamed Miraoui to the site of the fire.